New Orleans Fishing Charters

Everything you would ever want to know about New Orleans Fishing Charters.

Louisiana is called the Sportsman’s Paradise for good reason.  Some of the best sport fishing in the country can be found withing a short drive from New Orleans LA.  With a empahisis on the sport of fishing, coupled with our southern hospitality, you are guaranteed a good time, or as we say “Laissez le bon ton roulet”.

Your guides can offer inshore fishing charters for redfish, speckled trout, as well as red snapper and even more varieties offered for offshore fishing. Most charter captains run fleets of more than one boat to accommodate even the largest of groups, or a visiting family of four.

Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico

Fishing Reports and Information

2 Stroke vs 4 Stroke Outboard Motors

2 stroke and 4 stroke outboard motors

With all of the New Orleans fishing and fishing out of Venice LA, just about everyone in Louisiana has a boat.  Whether you are looking at a new boat and motor or you are looking to freshen your old boat up for the Spring fishing season with a new motor, choosing the right design is important. One of the largest investments in your boat is the type of outboard motor.  We will give a brief discussion of the differences between the 2 stroke and 4 stroke outboard motor for your next boat.

Many people are tasked with making a choice between a 2-stroke and a 4-stroke outboard motor for their fishing vessel. There are many factors that play a big part when choosing one over the other. Ever since its invention and release to the public, the 2-stroke outboard motor dominated the marine market. The man credited with producing the first reliable outboard motor was Ole Evinrude. In 1909 Ole produced a 2-stroke outboard motor that ran on an oil and gas mixture that eventually led to the creation of the Evinrude Motor Company. This 2-stroke design was the go-to power plant for almost all recreational boating. From small flat boats to larger offshore fishing rigs, the 2-stroke remained king for many decades. That is until recent years with new developments in technology helping the 4-stroke slide into the marine markets.

Difference Between a 2 Stroke and a 4 Stroke Motor

The 4 Stroke Motor

In the early years the 4-stroke marine outboards were large and very expensive to maintain. Developments over the years have helped the 4-stroke shed some weight to be closer to a 2-stroke of comparable output. Much like cars and trucks, consumers have some choices between EFI and DFI systems also. Both of which are much more efficient than carbureted engines. Although most of the smaller output motors around 5hp and 10hp are still carbureted. When it comes to the big block outboards of 150hp and 300hp, fuel injection is the way to go for efficiency over the long run.

Some of the things needed to consider when purchasing a new outboard, or a used one, are what types of activities will the motor be used for, what type of boat it will be installed on, locations to be running the boat, and cost of maintenance just to name a few. In the past 2-stroke motors were very load at high speeds and have a rough idle compared to a 4-stroke motor. While this is true for the most part, new technology and other advancements have made some 2-strokes almost as quiet as their 4-stroke counterparts. People wanting takeoff power have usually gone to the 2-stroke for the torque off the line. With advances in performance the 4-stroke now has takeoff power and long run efficiency to go with it. There are many models that are supercharged for increased performance and we all love forced induction.

outboard motorsWith quieter running and smoother idle a 4-stroke may be the way to go for trolling but maintenance costs are higher than with a 2-stroke. However, some of the newer 2-stroke Evinrude motors offer smoother idle, quieter running, and improved economy while keeping the simplicity of 2-stroke maintenance. If long runs are the primary use then the smooth operation and fuel economy of the 4-stroke may be where it’s at. If the primary location is protected waters a 4-stroke may be the only choice other than paddles. Another thing to keep in mind is that spare motor we rarely use but may come to depend on at some time.  

Whichever way you decide to go for your fishing vessel keep all the tasks you will perform when boating as well as the performance recommendations of the boat manufacturer in mind before making a final decision. An outboard is a rather large purchase for most people and a wrong buy can mean a lot of aggravation, frustration, and financial headaches down the road. Compare the pros and cons of each motor on your vessel and make an educated and confidant choice to power your outings on the water.

 

Spring Fishing in Venice, LA

Capt Troy

Venice, LA Fishing Heats Up

Year round fishing in Venice, LA is what makes this spot so appealing to sportsman from around the globe.  Those trophy Swordfish and Marlin are there for the taking, but know that the Spring months bring a vast migration of even more large game fish.

If you are looking for Charter fishing out of New Orleans, Venice Charters are the place to go during the early Spring months is one of the best due to the migration of the large schools of tuna and wahoo.  If you enjoy reeling in that supersized tuna, you can land yellowfin, some weighing up to 200lbs as they invade our gulf waters in early Spring.

Tuna Tuna Tuna

The yellowfin tuna is a strong fish, that is built for speed and to put up a good fight for any angler. The yellowfin is identified easily by it’s beautiful, metallic dark blue color on it’s back  that blends to a pretty yellowish-silver color on it’s belly.  You will notice a golden stripe on each side of it’s body and two dorsal fins, an anal fin, and two pectoral fins.  Using the services of an experienced Charter Captain in Venice, LA will help you identify each species of large game fish you reel in.

Historic “Midnight Lump”

Your trip should include a stop at the famous Midnight Lump.  The Midnight Lump is a vast mountain of salt under water that rises up to 200 ft at it’s surface peak.  You will find large numbers of big game fish lurking below, such as a variety of yellowfin, blackfin, and bluefin tuna.   This hot spot also provides large amberjacks, shark and mahi mahi, all searching for food.  The Spring and Summer months are best for fishing this well known spot, the Midnight Lump, but year round, you can land some of your largest gamefish at this location.

Trophy Fish

With Venice being one of the best destinations for fishing charters in the US, Our Charter Fishing Captains who fish out of Venice, LA will tell you more large trophy fish are caught off Venice, LA than anyplace else in the United States.  Family trips, corporate trips and even bachelor/bachelorette trips will provide a day, or even two of an experience you will cherish.

Book your New Orleans fishing charter trip today with an experienced Charter Fishing Captain out of Venice, LA and remember to bring your camera.

 

 

The Lionfish – Enemy to New Orleans Offshore Fishing

lionfish

The Lionfish Not a Native to The Gulf of Mexico

The Lionfish originate from the Indo-Pacific and Red Sea.  Lionfish began appearing in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, and they have now made our Gulf of Mexico home and are rapidly spreading throughout the region. The presence of the Lionfish has substantially affected New Orleans charter fishing.  It is believed that the Lionfish spread into the Gulf after they were introduced by people who had them in aquariums near the area of Southeast Florida in the 1980’s.  Louisiana fishing charter captains are watching and recording the migration and captures of this predator in the Gulf of Mexico.   This fish could impact the numbers of native fish in our region.

Lionfish Facts

  • It is not uncommon to find more than 100 lionfish on a small reef at one time
  • Lionfish possess 13 dorsal, 2 pelvic, and 3 anal spines that are venomous
  • An accidental stick from a Lionfish can be very painful
  • They have fins that are needle-sharp, and can easily penetrate wet suits
  • Lionfish are very elusive to the angler hook & line, making them difficult to catch
  • Lionfish have no natural predators in our area, nothing in our Gulf of Mexico will eat them except us!
  • Lionfish eat aggressively our native fish and crustaceans
  • The Lionfish has been observed eating prey up to 2/3 their own size!
  • Lionfish have shown the ability to withstand starvation for periods of up to 12 weeks.
  • Lionfish are found in higher densities in our Gulf of Mexico compared to other invaded regions
  • Lionfish in the Gulf of Mexico are capable of releasing up to an average of 27,000, but as high as 115,000 eggs as often as every 2-3 days.
  • Lionfish are typically white, with maroon stripes, but they have the ability to change colors to blend in with their environments over time.
  • You may also find Lionfish that are almost completely white or black.

Size Matters

LionfishAdult lionfish in the Gulf of Mexico can average approximately 9 inches long, and just over one-half pound in weight. Remember from the above list, they can eat prey up to 2/3 their own size.  The largest lionfish recorded in the Gulf of Mexico was 17.2 inches long. The world record lionfish was captured in Southeast Florida and was 18.5 inches long.  These numbers can certainly grow, as the amount of Lionfish are captured and recorded.

What to Do if you Capture this Predator

Well, for starters, be careful.  Handling this predator can lend to be quite painful if you are stuck by one of their many venomous fins.  Though the sticks have not shown to cause fatalities, they can cause swelling and extreme pain.  The Lionfish Coalition suggests using submersion in non-scalding hot water. Over-the-counter anti-inflammatory or pain medications may also be helpful in reducing the pain and swelling associated with a lionfish sting. Allergic reactions or shock symptoms should be considered an emergency situation, and you need to seek immediate medical treatment.

Now, if you happen to “safely” capture a few Lionfish, their a quite a tasty meal.  Their meat is mild, sweet, and flaky. Lionfish can be prepared many ways and Lionfish are just as safe to eat as  Snapper and Grouper.  Use these tasty lil predators in chowder, sautéed, deep fried whole, even with lemon or lime in ceviche.

Recipes for Lionfish, Let’s Eat Them Before They Eat Our Native fish!

Fried Lionfish

Ingredients:

  • 42 ounces Lionfish fillets, patted dry
  • Flour (for coating)
  • 5 cloves of diced garlic
  • 2 cups chopped cherry tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup white wine
  • 1/4 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 T. chopped fresh basil
  • lemon wedge for garnish

Preparation: Dredge fillets in flour to lightly dust. Place in sauté pan with small amount of hot butter over medium heat. Cook first side, careful not to burn.

Turn over fish when golden, and reduce heat. Add the garlic, tomatoes,  white wine and lemon juice. Cover and cook until fish is fork-tender.  Garnish with a lemon wedge.

Lionfish Ceviche

The acid from one or more types of citrus juices “cook” the fish, while flavors are added with  chilies, and herbs. Ceviche should only be made with the freshest of seafood.

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juiceLionfish Ceviche
  • 1/3 cup fresh-squeezed orange juice
  • 3 Tbs. fresh-squeezed lime juice
  • Pinch of sugar to taste
  • Pinch of salt to taste
  • 1/2 lb. lionfish fillets cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 12 cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • 1 small, ripe avocado, pitted and cubed
  • 1/2 cup cubed cucumber
  • 2 serrano chilies, minced
  • 2 Tbs. fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 Tbs. fresh mint, chopped
  • 2 Tbs. olive oil

Directions:
In a glass or plastic bowl, stir together lemon, lime, and orange juices. Season with salt and just enough sugar to offset the acid of the citrus juice.

Cut the Lionfish filets into 1/2-inch cubes, and add to the citrus juice. Be sure to Completely cover the fish with the citrus juices, this basically “cooks” the fish with the acids. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.

In a bowl, combine the tomatoes, avocado, cucumber, chilies, cilantro, and mint and stir to combine.

Transfer the fish to a colander and drain for several seconds. Once drained, add the fish to the tomato mixture and mix.

Drizzle with the combined ingredients with oil and salt to taste

Divide the ceviche among four small bowls and serve immediately.

 

If you are interested, click the lionfish records link for the current Gulf States lionfish records, and to report a state record in the Gulf of Mexico that you have captured, please contact the Gulf Coast Lionfish Coalition for instructions