New Orleans Fishing Charters

Everything you would ever want to know about New Orleans Fishing Charters.

Louisiana is called the Sportsman’s Paradise for good reason.  Some of the best sport fishing in the country can be found withing a short drive from New Orleans LA.  With a empahisis on the sport of fishing, coupled with our southern hospitality, you are guaranteed a good time, or as we say “Laissez le bon ton roulet”.

Your guides can offer inshore fishing charters for redfish, speckled trout, as well as red snapper and even more varieties offered for offshore fishing. Most charter captains run fleets of more than one boat to accommodate even the largest of groups, or a visiting family of four.

Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico

Fishing Reports and Information

In Search Of The Largest Kokanee

 

THE LARGEST KOKANEE SALMON

The hunt for the largest Oncorhynchus nerka, or Kokanee Salmon, a landlocked freshwater variety of the Sockeye salmon, offers anglers around the world a unique opportunity to test their rod and line skills and mettle. Ron A. Campbell, a 69 year-old angler from Pendleton in Oregon, currently holds the International Game Fish Association’s All Tackle World Record for catching the largest officially-recognized kokanee.

On June 13, 2010, the then 61-year-old Campbell caught a 9-pound 10-ounce kokanee at Wallowa Lake. The fish was 27.75 inches (70.485 cm) in length and had a girth of 17.75 inches (45.085 cm). The previous world record was held by Canadian angler, Norm Kuhn, who landed a 9-pound 6-ounce kokanee in British Columbia’s Lake Okanagan in 1988, a record that stood for 22 years before Campbell busted it, bringing the world record title back to the United States.

For the last 8 years, anglers have flocked to both Lake Okanagan and Oregon’s Wallowa Lake in search of their own world record, but with just over 8 years in, Campbell’s record is still holding strong.

 

A SPECIAL TYPE OF SALMON

This stunningly beautiful silver-to-gray fish that turns a shade of red, green or yellow when spawning, based on gender and environmental factors, first drew attention in lakes of its native regions of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington in the United States, Canada’s British Columbia and Yukon regions, and Japan and Russia.

Wildlife organizations and others later introduced the kokanee to additional U.S. states and Canadian regions as its popularity grew, especially because its diet of zooplankton and insects makes it an excellent freshwater forage fish for other larger fish species. Unlike other ocean-going salmon, the kokanee normally only reaches a weight of 2 to 5 pounds (0.907 to 2.267 kg) and a length of 8 to 12 inches (20.32 to 30.48 cm) by the time it spawns after only typically four years of life.

The density of shrimp and other zooplankton and other environmental factors can increase its weight and size. In 2010, Campbell became the first angler since 1988 to catch a kokanee weighing more than 9 pounds (4.082 kg). In previous years, those on the hunt for a monster kokanee felt lucky to catch any that weighed 6 or 7 pounds (2.721 to 3.175 kg).

 

PATIENCE, PERSEVERANCE AND PERFECT GEAR

Ron Campbell’s story reveals the type of dedication and hard work it normally takes for an angler to find and catch a record-setting kokanee.

Wallowa Lake, a 4 1/2 mile long, glacier-formed lake located among forested hills and mountainous peaks at an elevation of above 4,300 feet, offers fishing enthusiasts a view of 8 1/2 miles of shoreline and a fishing depth of 298-feet. Campbell didn’t catch his kokanee by accident. He often took his boat out whenever possible during breaks from his fire investigating duties in the hope of finding a massive kokanee.

Since kokanee are fierce fighters when caught, sometimes referred to as “silver salmon on drugs”, and not typically attracted to normal large bait, Campbell chose his gear for the hunt carefully. On that Sunday, he used a Lamiglas Cascade Pro XT rod, Ambassadeur 4500C reel, 10-pound P-Line fishing line and a Shasta Tackle Pee Wee Hoochie lure.

The experienced angler knows that the best way to catch a kokanee is with a strong 10-pound or higher line to prevent snapped lines and a small, attractive bait or lure, such as a corn kernel, worm piece, larva, ale-egg lure, salmon egg or a lure that looks like a shrimp or insect. Campbell patiently dragged his lure for hours along the water using the trolling method until the first sign of activity.  When the fish bit, he then fought to bring the beauty onto his boat using every technique he knew.

 

THE LEGACY OF AN AMAZING CATCH

After his IGFA recognition, Campbell received additional recognition from several fishing magazine publishers and tackle companies. One company, after hearing that Campbell didn’t have the right sized net that day for such a large fish, sent him a larger one. Shasta Tackle Company awarded Campbell the right to order any of their fishing gear for free for life.

Campbell also continues to receive requests for appearances to discuss kokanee fishing at Wallowa Lake, which is known to produce larger than normal kokanee. His feat has also set the bar in a growing sport. Eight years on, no one has beat Ron Campbell’s kokanee record, but his story inspires young and old anglers everywhere.

To catch your next “monster fish” consider the assistance of a local charter fisherman or reputable expert fishing guide.  Their experience in the waters you wish to fish can make the difference between bringing home a great catch, or just more “fish tales” to add to the list.  Happy fishing!

What to Expect Charter Fishing in LA

charter boat fishing

What to Expect Charter Fishing in Louisiana

 

Whether you are using a charter boat company for deep sea fishing out of Venice or going to a fishing rodeo, it is important to understand what you could catch in the Gulf waters of Louisiana. The water located at the mouth of the Mississippi River provides for a unique mix of different fish, and sometimes the size may surprise you.

 

Here are just some of the fish that you would expect to catch when going out with a Louisiana charter boat fishing crew at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

 

Understanding the Waters of the Mississippi

charter fishing out of louisianaOne of the reasons why you want to be hooking up with the charter boat fishing team is because this is going to be a fishing trip unlike any you have experienced before. The waters in this areas attract a number of different types of fish due in part to the way that the water from the river flows into the gulf. The area near the mouth of the Mississippi River is appealing to a number of different fish because the freshwater flows on the top while the saltwater lays on the bottom. Why this is so appealing to the fish is because the waters don’t mix and they aren’t brackish.

 

When your charter fishing boat is stopped in one location in this region, it’s like fishing in two separate waters at the same time. The fish that enjoy the freshwater are swimming in the exact same waters that the saltwater fish love. When the fishing boat is close to the flats, there is only so much room where all of these fish can get around, so they are often jumping on the hooks.

 

Different Fishing Experience Each Trip

With the unique composition of the water near the Gulf of Mexico, the different types of fish certainly make for a unique fishing experience. Although certain fish move around during different seasons, due to the mixture in the water, it is not uncommon to go fishing twice in the same week to the same spot and catch completely different species of fish.

 

Whether you are trying to improve your casting skills or catch that largemouth bass that has eluded you, the Louisiana charter boat fishing team will get you in position to have an amazing experience each trip out.

 

Catching Your Limit of RedFish

Once the boat reaches the mouth of the Mississippi River, you won’t have to wait very long before you see those redfish hitting your bait. Depending on the day and the bait you are using, it is not out of the question for you to hit your limit of redfish because they are in such abundance in certain spots. With the lower levels of water and the right lure, the redfish are on the hunt for food and will gravitate towards the bait in short order. Your captain will have the boat positioned so that you can load up on redfish and then just a mile south will be reeling in the trout.

 

Unlike other charter fishing tours, the redfish you will catch on this tour are huge. Even though they spawn in the fall, they tend to be moving in the shallows in huge numbers, so even the smaller ones can weigh it at 18 or more pounds. There are going to be some lucky fishermen on the boat today who shouldn’t be surprised to see a redfish topping the 30 pound mark.

Yellowfin Tuna

The most common fish that many people from around the country use the Gulf waters to catch is the mighty Yellowfin Tuna.  Not only are these fish incredibly delicious to eat – but catching a 300 pound fish on a rod and reel can change your life.  There are many Louisiana fishing charters that specialize in Yellowfin Tuna.  With the large fish coming into the area to breed on a schedule, the best fishing charters may run specials during certain times of the year, knowing that you will be able to catch as many as you have the fortitude to reel in.  With the mighty yellowfin being in the deeper waters of the Gulf – many of the charters that focus on them go out of Venice LA.

 

Largemouth Bass Bragging Rights

Largemouth bass

largemouth bass

Perhaps you have already caught what you think is the biggest fish of your career, the crew of the Louisiana charter fishing boat will help you break those records and then some. On some days, you could be casting in the shallows and snag a largemouth bass one out of every three casts. Don’t be surprised to see speckled trout and redfish fighting for that same bait some days too. The size of the largemouth bass in these region of the Mississippi River will do serious damage to those out on the boat with light tackle. This is the time you want to be using your best lures in the tackle box.

 

The team of the Louisiana charter fishing boat know the area like the back of there hands, and will show inexperienced fisherman that all you need to do to land a largemouth bass is to place some jigs or swimbaits under a cork and go. Throw out those rigs and pop the cork a few times to attract the fish, and you might break the boat record for the days biggest catch.

 

Understanding the Complexities of the Basin

Your Louisiana charter fishing boat crew are very familiar with the water of this region, and will help both inexperienced and seasoned fishermen to make the most of their time out on the waters. It is likely that the spots the boat stops will allow passengers to start reeling in fish after just a few casts. In stained water it is usually unlikely for a fish to come slashing at the cork, but that is something you will see happen several times. Usually fish will hit the topwater plug in clear water, but the unique flow of the basin water changes the dynamics of the fishing experience.

 

When the captain takes the boat a few miles out into the Gulf of Mexico, then things really change. Regardless how much experience that you have fishing in bays and tidal waters, the mixture of species of fish in that one area is unlike any other in the world. It is not uncommon to be fishing for redfish and have a huge trout bite at the bait. Part of the fun and excitement of renting the Louisiana charter fishing boat is that you just never know what you are going to catch at any given moment with any given bait.

 

Creating Memories for a Lifetime

Whether you want to spend some quality time out on the water with your dad, looking to get the kids into fishing, or just chumming around with the guys and looking to hook a monster for bragging rights, when you hire a charter captain they will put you in some of the best fishing holes to be found at the mouth of the Mississippi River.

 

This region also has a number of lodges you can rent so you can spend as much time out on the water as possible. Your charter boat captain will help to exceed your goals each day, creating a unique experience every single trip out on the water.

 

Each experience is unlike the other, and you’ll discover that the fish in this area range in all colors and sizes, making each journey a trip to remember.

Fishing From a Kayak

kayak fishing

Why Fish From a Kayak?

Kayaking has grown substantially as a water sport over the last several years—and fishermen are taking advantage of it. Many kayaks now come with fishing rod holders and live wells, and for those that don’t you can easy buy parts to attach your own.

Kayaks are obviously cheaper than boats, and the running and upkeep of them is also significantly less. You can pick up a Kayak to go fishing pretty inexpensively.  You don’t have expensive batteries to charge or replace, you don’t have to fill it with gas, you don’t have to have a trailer, and your kayak does not have to be registered, so long as it has no motor.

But other than the obvious—

Why are so many fishermen trying out kayak fishing?

 

Well, here are 6 reasons kayak fishing has exploded in popularity:

 

Kayak fishing is cheap.

As mentioned before, there’s no fuel, insurance, storage, launch fees, motor and battery upkeep, trailer upkeep… I could go on. After the initial costs, you pretty much run for free. It’s important to remember what you need though—the kayak (which can run you anywhere from $150 to over $1000 depending on what you get and which brand it is), the paddle, and a life vest. Also useful to get would be an anchor, a dry bag, a small tackle box, a small ice chest, some bungee cords, and comfortable seat if your kayak doesn’t come with one. Assuming you already own the fishing tackle, that’s not too bad of an upfront cost compared to a motorboat.  Click Here to look for Kayak fishing stuff

 

Kayaks are comfortable.

There have been so many improvements to kayaks—fully raised chairs, comfortable seat backs, drink holders. All of your gear is within arm’s reach of you. And you learn exactly the items you truly need to bring.

 

Kayaks are stealthy.

A kayak is quieter and less noticeable to fish than any motor boat. You don’t even have a trolling motor to make noise. In a kayak, the pressure from the bow of the boat is so little that there are not even small ripples to scare fish away. You can even add to your stealth by adhering stealth rubber to every spot on your boat that you lay paddles, tackle boxes and rods.

 

It’s easier to cast from a kayak.

When you cast from a motor boat, it is mostly perpendicular to the bank and your lure swims from shallow water to deep. When you’re in a kayak, you have a major advantage by placing your kayak right on the marsh grass. Then you can cast up the grass line and retrieve along the grass. This is typically where a lot of fish are. When you cast into open water from the shoreline, the lure swims the natural path of a bait fish—from deep to shallow water.

 

Kayaks can get anywhere.

Speaking of placing your kayak on the marsh grass—with a boat, you can’t do this. Kayaks can fit into almost anywhere. In Louisiana marshes, there are so many small inlets and pockets that boats can’t fit, but you’ll find that your kayak can!  They may not work out for deep sea fishing for Mahi Mahi – but you get the point. 

 

Kayaks are more fun even when you aren’t catching fish.

Unfortunately, there is always that one day where not a single fish will bite. Because a kayak is so stealthy, you’re likely to see tons of other wildlife around that you wouldn’t see in a boat. Also, you can take your kayak out for the day just for sightseeing or exercise, and you won’t be wasting tons of money on gas. Even if you’ve bought a fishing kayak, you can load that thing down for a scenic day trip for just as much fun!

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